Charity Governance Award Winners 2017
May 24th, 2017 by Janet Thorne

The stories from this year’s Charity Governance Awards winners and entrants are a vivid illustration of the difference a good board can make. They tell of boards that have brought fresh thinking,  integrity and a clear vision to their charity’s work, strengthened its impact and, sometimes, averted disaster. The charities themselves range from tiny to large, and their causes are diverse. The governance categories they entered include digital, diversity, impact and turnaround.

They are all stories of great leadership, exercised as a team, for a common cause.

This is quite at odds with the way that we, as a sector, usually talk about trusteeship. Often the focus is on the fiduciary and the language is all compliance, liability, duty. For a long time, I was deeply uninterested in anything to do with trusteeship: it had a fusty, almost Dickensian connotation, and the link between trustees and the work of the charity – the difference it made – seemed tenuous.

However, as the entrants for this year’s awards (and last year’s too) clearly demonstrate, good governance involves so much more than just getting the basics of compliance and scrutiny right.

Keeping hold of the bigger picture

A common theme of these stories is of trustees keeping hold of the bigger picture and not being afraid to think afresh about how their focus should shift in the context of a changing world. In some cases this meant deciding to narrow their remit to key strategic activity, and stopping anything that did not contribute to this. (This can be so hard to do in practice!) Dementia UK decided to focus on exclusively providing care through specialist Admiral Nurses. For others this meant broadening their mission to create a more holistic approach. For example, Off The Record expanded its work from providing counselling services for young people to a mental health service for the same audience. Body & Soul widened the focus of its services from young people with HIV to a broader range of beneficiaries. Always, the board were careful to keep true to the overall purpose of the charity, and to the needs of service users.

Another strand (and a refreshing change from the stereotype of risk averse boards) is the willingness of the trustees to be ready to try new things where this helps them achieve their goals. Voluntary Arts’ BAME Advisory Panel incorporated shared meals into their meetings to help build inclusivity, Raise the Roof has embedded the use of several off-the-shelf platforms to deliver services and increase participation at board level. There are stories of boards taking bold decisions, based on calculated risk to achieve more – for example, Preston Road Women’s Centre took advantage of the Empty Homes Partnership to develop a new programme providing safe accommodation for women escaping domestic abuse.

Collective and collaborative action

The entrants share an evident belief in the value of collective, and collaborative, action; a willingness to look outwards and work in partnership with other organisations. There is also a real seriousness: clarity about the change that the board wants to achieve and determination to draw on the right information and processes to achieve this. These are boards who are interested in the impact of their organisation’s work, who seek evidence of the difference their service makes and take corrective action where necessary. They are also boards who are willing to step up to the plate when the going gets tough. Witness the courage and commitment shown by the trustees of Kentish Town City Farm when faced with a seemingly hopeless situation.

Seeing is believing

These stories are important for three reasons. They show how there is more to being a trustee than scrutinising accounts. They also offer a counterpoint to the bad press that governance has had in the last couple of years – the plethora of stories about people doing it wrong and a focus on the ‘problems of governance’. This negative focus is problematic, and not only because it creates an unbalanced picture of trusteeship. It actually contributes to the problem: underlying much of the existing bad governance. From poor trustee recruitment to lack of board engagement, there is a lack of appreciation of, or even belief in, the difference that a good board can make to a charity. Sharing examples of good governance is one of the most powerful ways to help people to understand the value of good trusteeship. It makes it tangible. These stories demonstrate that good governance really does matter, that it really is possible, and that it is worth striving to achieve. So, please read and enjoy these stories, and share them widely.

The Charity Governance Awards is organised by the Clothworkers’ Company, in partnership with Reach Volunteering, NPC and Prospectus.

The winners were announced at a ceremony at the Clothworkers Hall in London on Wednesday 24 May 2017.

Janet Thorne leads Reach as Chief Executive

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Charity Governance Awards 2017
October 10th, 2016 by Lucia das Neves

Entries are now open to charities both large and small, from all sectors, for the Charity Governance Awards 2017 – the UK awards that recognise and reward good charity governance.

Reach Volunteering is delighted to be a partner in these awards that by shining a spotlight on the best of the sector, demonstrate how effective governance can transform a charity and the lives of its beneficiaries.

Entry to the awards is free. Each of the seven categories offers a £5,000 cash prize.

The award categories are:

  • Board diversity & inclusivity
  • Embracing digital
    Embracing opportunity & harnessing risk
  • Improving impact – charities with three paid staff or fewer (including charities with no paid staff)
  • Improving impact – charities with 4-25 paid staff
  • Improving impact – charities with 26 paid staff or more
  • Managing turnaround.

Last year’s winners

Looking for inspiration for your entry? Want to know what makes an award winner special? Browse the profile pages and short films for the winners, and the shortlisted charities.

How to enter

You can enter online for free until 13 January 2017. The winners will be announced at the invite-only free awards ceremony drinks reception on 24 May 2017. Follow the conversation at #charitygov17

The Charity Governance Awards are organised by The Clothworkers’ Company – a City Livery company that supports trusteeship initiatives – in partnership with NPC (New Philanthropy Capital), Prospectus and Reach.

Lucia is the Marketing and Communications Manager at Reach Volunteering.

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April 6th, 2016 by Janet Thorne

Scarcely a week seems to go by without some bad news story about charity governance. Kids Company, fundraising scandals, harsh words from a House of Commons Committee; there has been a stream of news articles illustrating how bad governance can be and the terrible implications of this. And yes, bad governance is clearly a serious problem.

But is this a fair picture of governance in the sector? No! There are many truly amazing but unsung boards out there, steering their charities through perilous waters with good judgement, great courage and lots of hard work.

How do I know this? Because I have just been reading through examples of many such boards. I have had the privilege to be one of the judges in the inaugural Charity Governance Awards. Together with many much wiser heads than mine, we shortlisted from over 100 entries, and the calibre was truly impressive. We were looking for boards which had shown real leadership in improving impact, embracing opportunity and risk, demonstrating diversity and inclusion, or turning around their charity’s fortunes.

It was a humbling and inspiring experience: instances of trustees making tough decisions for the long term, going the extra mile to create vibrant, diverse boards, seizing new opportunities without betraying the charity’s values, to name but a few.

Whilst the challenges and the responses varied widely (as did the nature and size of the charities), all showed great commitment and leadership. They seemed to me to demonstrate the personal qualities of good trustees, as outlined by charity lawyer Philip Kirkpatrick recently: conscientiousness, inquisitiveness, courage and judgement – meshed with effective challenge.

Of course there are cases of poor governance, and we should study them closely. But there are also many cases of brilliant governance, and we can, perhaps, learn even more from them. Certainly we should be sharing these stories to bring balance to the flow of bad news and to remind ourselves that the charity sector has much to be proud of.

I am looking forward to 12 May when the winners will be announced and we can celebrate their success. But, even more so, I am eagerly anticipating sharing the stories of the shortlisted through an ebook that will be compiled soon afterwards. There are wonderful Boards out there, and we all deserve to know about them!

Janet Thorne leads Reach as Chief Executive

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Charity Governance Awards banner
October 21st, 2015 by Janet Thorne

We are proud to be inaugural partners of the new Charity Governance Awards 2016, organised by The Clothworkers’ Company, and in partnership with NPC and Prospectus.

We have been working on these awards for a while: you may remember that last year we blogged about an upcoming governance award to promote, reward and celebrate good governance. Now, more than ever, we all need a focus on trustee boards that are really effective.

The recent headlines about Kids Company have provided plenty of coverage about what happens when governance fails. Every charity needs to take stock and ask: could this happen to our charity? Is our board sufficiently well informed and robust? However, there is also danger that the pendulum swings the other way, and boards become overcautious and risk averse. Indeed, there is a long running critique that many charity trustees are too cautious.

The new Charity Governance Awards will shine the spotlight on cases where boards have got it right. The awards are designed to generate examples of the impact that good governance – for example, a focus on impact, or in leading a charity to turnaround its fortunes. We hope that this will reward good practice and inspire other boards. The awards will demonstrate what a positive and pivotal role trusteeship can be – and this is essential if we are to attract more good people to the role.

Entries for the awards are now open to charities both large and small, from all sectors. We are keen to encourage entries from all charities that have great boards and the awards are designed to be equally accessible to smaller charities. Mindful that such trustees are often focused on things other than entering for awards, we have ensured that the process is easy, entry is free, and that each of the six categories offers a £5000 cash prize.

If you think that your charity has a great board visit the website to find out how to enter. Similarly, if you know of a such a charity, please reward them with a nomination.

The award categories are:

  1. Improving impact – charities with 3 paid staff or fewer (including charities with no paid staff)
  2. Improving impact – charities with 4–25 paid staff
  3. Improving impact – charities with 26 paid staff or more
  4. Board diversity & inclusivity
  5. Managing turnaround
  6. Embracing opportunity & harnessing risk

The deadline for all entries is 15 January 2016 and those who have been short-listed will be invited to the awards event in London on 12 May 2016, where the winners will be announced.

Thank you to everyone who took part in the original survey – your contributions and thoughts are much appreciated.

Visit the Charity Governance Awards website to find out more.

 

Janet Thorne leads Reach as Chief Executive

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Spark of creativity
November 24th, 2014 by Janet Thorne

Governance – and good governance in particular – is vital for all charities. Reach was deeply engaged with Trustees’ Week which, as always, was a great opportunity to celebrate the fantastic work of trustees across the UK.

From issues of diversity and finance to strategy and recruitment, we are keenly aware of the many challenges faced by trustees in the difficult role of steering their organisations through a time of uncertainty and, in many cases, austerity.

Having met with countless charities who have demonstrated incredible resilience and innovation, we have been inspired to work with our partners, the Clothworkers’ Company, Prospectus and NPC to design a new and exciting award which recognises great governance in action.

We know that there are a number of governance awards already out there so, rather than create an award which replicates existing ones, we want to create an award which celebrates and showcases some of the inspiring stories that many trustees have to share. We really want to demonstrate, through stories and actions, how good governance in trying times can make all the difference. We also want to develop awards that will be really worthwhile to the award winners.

Of course, we realise that there may not be an appetite in the sector for another award, so we are appealing to you to let us know if this is something that we should proceed with. As such, we would be extremely grateful if you could let us know your thoughts by completing the survey below. It’s only a handful of questions so it’ll only take a minute, I promise!

Complete the survey now and help shape the awards

Thank you for taking the time.

Janet Thorne leads Reach as Chief Executive

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NUS logo
March 26th, 2014 by Luke Strachan

TrusteeWorks from Reach is delighted to announce that we are now a preferred supplier of National Union of Students (NUS) regarding our trustee recruitment services.

Having  had great success in our work with students’ unions over the last few years, the TrusteeWorks team is excited to be moving forward with NUS in a more formal capacity as preferred supplier.

We are confident that this relationship will give us the opportunity to help many more students’ unions source fantastic external trustees.

Luke heads up Reach’s TrusteeWorks team

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2014 Calendar
January 22nd, 2014 by Madeleine Boomgaarden

Reach Volunteering has entered 2014 on a strong note! We have secured long-term funding from institutions like GlaxoSmithKline and City Bridge Trust and plan to introduce iReach, our new web-based platform. This will dramatically increase the volume, range and quality of skilled volunteering across the U.K.

iReach will come into service this summer, building an online community where charities and skilled volunteers meet, interact, and find their ideal match. It will create an increased number of matches and significantly reduce Reach’s transaction costs.

Reach had an excellent 2013 helping to place 20% more skilled volunteers than in the previous year, representing an estimated value of £8mn worth of skills transferred into the sector.

A Reach highlight was the decision to make our Trusteeworks Matching Service free from 1 November for charities with an annual turnover of less than £1mn. This led to a 150% increase in demand for the service.

There was a huge surge in volunteer registrations in the second half of the year, with an average of 167 new volunteers joining the Reach register every month, double the amount for the same period last year!

Charities continually need to fill vacancies in key roles, particularly as trustees. Reach, as the U.K’s leading skilled volunteering charity has been providing this invaluable service for more than 30 years. Our placement advisors are widely respected for their expertise and enthusiasm in finding the right match between skilled volunteer and charity.

Madeleine was Reach’s Marketing Manager until August 2014

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TrusteeWorks
October 23rd, 2013 by Madeleine Boomgaarden

Reach’s Trusteeworks Matching Service will be free from 1 November 2013 for charities with an annual turnover of under £1 million. Reach believes that removing the entry level charge of £75 for smaller charities, who have limited funds for recruiting, will make a big difference by helping them to strengthen their boards.

Strong boards, with a sufficient breadth of experience and skills, are crucial for charities facing difficult decisions in an uncertain economic climate. The ability to recruit outside a charity’s immediate networks by using a service like Reach is an important factor in this process.

The Trusteeworks Matching Service provides a free, high-quality introduction to skilled volunteers. The trustee role appears on Reach’s register of available trustee opportunities, and Reach’s recruitment teams search their extensive register of available volunteers, sound out candidates and forward suitable names to the charity.

In addition to the Matching Service, Reach offers the Trusteeworks Matching Plus Service and the Trusteeworks Premium Service which provide additional features such as preparing advertising copy for the role and in-depth screening and briefing of candidates.

Reach is the biggest recruiter of trustees in the UK having placed nearly 750 with charities all over the country since the launch of Trusteeworks in October 2009, including 185 in 2012 and 142 so far this year. Overall, Reach placed 500 volunteers in 2012 representing an estimated value of £9 million worth of skills transferred into the charity sector, and registered over 1,000 new volunteers and more than 1,100 placement opportunities with charities.

Madeleine was Reach’s Marketing Manager until August 2014

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Small Charity Week Team
May 14th, 2013 by Guest Contributor

Conchita from The FSI guest blogs in the run-up to 2013’s Small Charity Week.

Recent research by the FSI into the skills gaps within the small charity sector has shown that charitable organisations with an annual turnover under £1.5 million continue to struggle in key areas which impacts on their ability to deliver services.

The full report shows that as small charities prioritise the use of funding to deliver frontline programmes, they are increasingly unable to train or develop staff and volunteers. 66% of respondents stated there was no funding available for training and development, while 37% said there would be no room to improve their charitable services, which could impair the quality delivered to beneficiaries.

Small charities reported that impact reporting, long-term strategic planning and marketing were the areas in which they were struggling to plug this skills gap in their organisation. To see the full report, please click here.

Small Charity Week 2013 will be taking place between the 17th-22nd June and aims to address some of the issues raised by small charities as areas in which they struggle. Small charities can sign up to six days of free initiatives and competitions, including cash prizes, pro-bono advice and guidance from third sector and business experts including, the FSI, Reach, Oxfam and Credit Suisse to name a few. Also available will be opportunities for small charities to engage with policy makers and influencers when Nick Hurd, Minister of Civil Society hosts a cross-party event at Westminster on Policy Day.

Small charities have told us they continue to rely heavily on volunteers to support their activity and for the first time the FSI are including a Volunteering Day into the week’s programme to help small charities to promote their volunteer opportunities and find the skills they need for their organisation. We are excited to be working alongside Reach to support charities on this day.

The full breakdown for the week is as follows:

  • I Love Small Charities Day – 17 June: Three competitions to win funds for your charity
  • Big Advice Day – 18 June: Pro-bono advice on any charity topic of your choosing will be available from experts across the sector and business leaders either face to face or via phone or Skype
  • Policy Day – 19 June: Local and national events will be held to support engagement between small charities and policy makers and influencers
  • Volunteering Day – 20 June: Showcase your small charity volunteering opportunities and register for free events including a Media Trust speed-matching event.
  • Fundraising Day – 21 June: Take part in a number of competitions and initiatives to raise vital funds for your small charity for FREE, including the chance to win a share of £1,000 from the Vodafone Foundation, to raise funds from eBay users during Small Charity Week or receive your quiz toolkit to run your own community event.
  • Celebration Day – 22 June: Book your free charity stand to engage with the public at a mini festival held in central London, or why not run your own event to celebrate your amazing work.

Small charities can sign up to all of the free activities of Small Charity Week through the website smallcharityweek.com and follow news through twitter @SCWeek2013 or the Facebook page

Conchita Garcia is Head of Projects and Development at The FSI. Here she blogs in a personal capacity.

Guest contributors are invited by Reach to give their own take on issues related to skilled volunteering and trusteeship. We hope you enjoy their articles.

Opinions expressed are those of the writer and may not reflect those of Reach.

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TrusteesWeek
November 6th, 2012 by Luke Strachan

This Trustees’ Week we learn that over five million young people would consider becoming a charity trustee.

That research is no surprise to Luke, our TrusteeWorks Manager and Young Charity Trustees Ambassador. “Young people bring fresh perspective, new ideas and professional skills to the board”, he says.

Luke will be taking part in the Guardian’s live debate on the changing role of trustees and charity boards on Tuesday 6 November. Join in to become part of the conversation.

Meanwhile, over on YouTube, Alex talks about being young and on the board.

Luke heads up Reach’s TrusteeWorks team

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